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HouseHold Festival 2013

Various locations, Ormeau Road, South Belfast
23 – 25 August, 2013

Based on the success of Household Festival 2012, Household Collective again organised Household Festival in August 2013. Household Festival was an event that encouraged audiences to re-negotiate the way in which they view and interact with art in the city. It offered an opportunity to experience new work in an unrestrictive and non-commercial context by inviting members of the public into artists’ homes.


For this project, the collective worked in partnership with PS² Gallery, a Belfast city centre organisation whose focus is on urban intervention and social interaction by artists and cultural practitioners, architects, multidisciplinary groups and theorists.


There is a large concentration of creative professionals living in South Belfast, who, for the duration of the festival, opened up their households to showcase a variety of work, from fine art, performance and installation to live music, talks and discussions. The festival involved residents of over 50 houses and venues on and around the Ormeau Road and over 120 artists and creative professionals from across the city.


The festival included a programme of talks in the Ormeau Road Library that contextualised and critically examined how space in the city is used, and connotations invoked by the term ‘home’.


The rows of red brick terrace houses around the Ormeau Road hosted the festival’s activities, which included: music, dance, films, letter writing club, sound installations, soundscapes, collaborative poetry, embroidery, photography, sculpture, painting, banjo playing, architectural walking tours, curated dinners, a pop up water park, story telling, collecting ghost stories, a cycle tour, a discussion about the scarcity of trees in the city, a dream house for children, table tennis in the park, debates about housing, theatre, a walk with a reading of short stories about life in the area, a bowling lesson, Spanish lessons, conversation about Belfast Exposed, fiddle music from county Kerry, tea with music, cartoons, a drone performance, a pub quiz and disco, debates about the environment, a bicycle construction workshop, and much more.



This project was kindly supported by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, as well as local businesses and the wider Ormeau community.



Read an article written by Alissa Kleist about the festival here.